Viewing Islamic Feminism from Leila Aboulela’s Side Essay

267 WordsMay 27, 20142 Pages
Contrary to the belief of some people that Islam is against the women and against the European’s lifestyle. Some Muslim women, who live in Europe countries, write novels and short stories describing how Islam helps them to improve their female characterization. Religion is portrayed as an element of a new identity for those Muslim women who live in Europe. Reading The Translator by Leila Aboulela (Sudan/United Kingdom) and this paper are helping to understand how the repositioning of religion functions in women's lives and struggles. Also this paper examines the significance of Islamic spirituality in Leila Aboulela's The Translator (1999) is equally about the spiritual faith of an ordinary Muslim woman struggling with emotional and psychological grief. Aboulela in The Translator tells the story of Sammar, a Sudanese woman who lives by herself in a foreign country after her husband’s death. She spends in Scotland many years full of pain and loneliness, far from home and from her family and her son who lives in her mother in-law house in Khartoum. During this time religion is portrayed as an element of a new identity for her and becomes her only relief. After that she finds work as an Arabic to English translator for an Islamic scholar, Rae in a Scottish University. She falls in love with him but there is a problem there which is Rae is not a Muslim. For Sammar, Islam shapes her life and she cannot live with a man who cannot share with her, her belief. After that she decides to go back to Khartoum to live with her

More about Viewing Islamic Feminism from Leila Aboulela’s Side Essay

Open Document