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In Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, the Characters Raskolnikov, Luzhin, and Svidrigaïlov Are All Villains. This Paper Will Determine, Exactly What Each One Is Guilty of, How They Face Their Guilt, and the

  • Submitted by: maddles
  • on May 20, 2012
  • Category: English
  • Length: 1,515 words

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In spite of what the old cliché asserts, Crime and Punishment is a book that you can judge by its cover. For at the center of its intricate plot, tying everything together is plenty of crime and plenty of punishment. To achieve those ends Fyodor Dostoevsky created several villainous characters, three men that break both moral and legal laws. Their names are: Pyotr Petrovich Luzhin, Arkady Ivanovich Svidrigailov, and Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov. Dostoevsky has great skill as writer, so each character is unique and different as an actual human being.          
        By nature, Luzhin is stingy, haughty, domineering and manipulative. Consequently, one of his misdeeds is how he treats his impoverished fiancé, Dunya, and mother-in-law (Raskolnikov’s sister and mother respectively). Luzhin attempts to keep them helpless and dependant upon his wealth, by giving them only meager sums and providing them shabby living quarters. This plan backfires when Raskolnikov exposes his true character. “Peter Petrovich appeared not in the least to have expected such an ending. He had had too much confidence in himself, in his power and in the helplessness of his victims” (Dostoevsky, 292). After his initial scheme is foiled, Luzhin then connives away to get back at Raskolnikov. His endeavor in this regard is where he commits his second crime. Luzhin tries, but fails, to frame one of Raskolnikov’s friends.   On this occasion, his roommate gives him away. “I saw you, I saw you! I saw how you put it [a one-hundred rouble note] surreptitiously into her pockets” (382). If this evil ploy had worked, Luzhin’s victim would have gone to jail.
          Pyotr Petrovich Luzhin’s guilt is two-fold and undeniable. The way he faces it is paradoxically, by not facing it. First off, he blamed anyone but himself; “He blamed him, [Raskolnikov] and him alone, for everything” (293). Then, when caught red-handed, the devious miser still had the gall to deny his evil doing. “Stuff and nonsense, you...

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MLA Citation

"In Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, the Characters Raskolnikov, Luzhin, and Svidrigaïlov Are All Villains. This Paper Will Determine, Exactly What Each One Is Guilty of, How They Face Their Guilt, and the". Anti Essays. 21 Oct. 2018

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APA Citation

In Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, the Characters Raskolnikov, Luzhin, and Svidrigaïlov Are All Villains. This Paper Will Determine, Exactly What Each One Is Guilty of, How They Face Their Guilt, and the. Anti Essays. Retrieved October 21, 2018, from the World Wide Web: https://www.antiessays.com/free-essays/In-Fyodor-Dostoevsky-s-Crime-And-Punishment-263763.html