Sound Devices in "The Tyger" Essay

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Sound Devices in Poetry:
           
William Blake is a poet who wrote the successful peace entitled “The Tyger”. This poem was very well written as it displayed a vast variety of sound devices such as alliteration, repetition and onomatopoeia. These specific devices were used throughout the poem to express the theme creation of good and evil.   Alliteration was evident when Blake utilized this device to create the feeling and the presence of darkness and suffering “In what distant deeps or skies” (Blake 5). In doing so, Blake emphasized the point that God is all mighty, the father of all creation. Therefore to overlook this theory would be frowned upon and seen as a sinful act.
The second sound device that was evident throughout was the use of repetition as it attempted to contradict God’s hierarchy and the creation of humanity “Tyger! Tyger! Burning bright, in the forests of the night” (Blake, 1-3) “What immortal hand or eye” (Blake, 21-23). The significance of the repetition is that it expresses the ideas of both good and evil in the world through the creations of God.
The third sound device found in the poem was that of onomatopoeia. This device is the formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named to enrich the text. “And when thy heart began to beat” (Blake, 11).   The device was significant because it enhanced the reader’s ability to acquire fear of wrongdoing and evil as the Tyger was conceived, causing God’s integrity as the creator to be diminished.

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