Woolner And Croteau Analysis

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Since 1991, gas prices were maybe close to two dollars even for a gallon. A whole decade and some years later, gas prices are roughly $4.50 a gallon. These ridiculous jump in numbers have brought the value of currency down. Economy is bad, insurance policies went up, and people become more irritated as these absurd state of affairs keep happening. What is just as preposterous is how the upper, middle, and working classes differ in cultures because of their financial circumstances they find themselves in. Cate Woolner and Dan Croteau are a great example of how bizarrely different their relationship is because of their social status. Tamar Lewin explains, "Croteau...grew up in Keene, an old mill town in southern New Hampshire...had a difficult…show more content…
She had plenty options and more than she could ask for. Lewin goes to explain, "Woolner...comes from that other world. The daughter of a doctor and a dancer...in a comfortable home in Hartsdale, New York, with summer camps, vacations, and college education that wealthy Westchester County families can take for granted" (53). Having this sort of lifestyle compared to Dan's comes with a lot of complications that should not be as outrageous as they are. Lewin words it perfectly on page 53 where he says, "Marriages that cross class boundaries may not present as obvious a set of challenges as those that cross the lines of race or nationality. But in a quiet way, people who marry across class lines are also moving outside their comfort zones, into the uncharted territory of partners with a different level of wealth and education, and often, a different set of assumptions about things like manner, food, child-rearing, gift-giving, and how to spend vacations...one partner will usually have more money, more options, and almost inevitably, more power in the relationship." This enlightens how ridiculously different Dan and Cate's cultures were because of their financial…show more content…
Della Mae Justice took in her niece and nephew who were in foster care. She didn't grow up to immediately become middle-class. What Justice did was work so hard to climb out of the working-class to become middle-class so that her niece and nephew could have more than what she was offered when she was their age. Aware of the financial situations, Justice is compared to others in the upper and working class, she struggles with the different cultures each has. Lewin quotes Justice when she says, "'My stomach's always in knots getting ready to go to a party, wondering if I'm wearing the right thing, if I'll know what to do..." (70) This happens because of the different cultures the middle-class, which Justice is now in, presents, compared to the lower class she used to be in. Also because of this, Justice treats her niece and nephew completely different. She even went an extra step to make sure that the kids would fit in. To even further prove how crazy social classes determines the different cultures is when Lewin explains that, "...according to sociologists who have studied how social class affects child-rearing...working-class parents usually teach their children, early on, to do what they are told without argument and to manage their own free time, middle-class parents tend to play an active role in shaping their children's activities, seeking out extracurricular
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