Women's Role In World War II

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Women had many roles during World War II. They helped the military, worked in factories, and became nurses. Before the war, many women were just home makers. During World War II women could do anything. Even famous Rosie the Riveter once said, “We Can Do It!” (Panchyk 57) Women played a huge role in World War II. One of the important roles was working in the military. They served in all three services, Army, Air Force and Navy. When the government was recruiting women into the Army, they made it sound glamorous. When the women joined the Army, they did not get glamorous jobs. They were drivers, mess hall workers, cleaners, plane trackers and mechanics. Women were not allowed to fire guns and as the war continued on other jobs opened up…show more content…
In addition to the Navy, Air Force and Army, many women were secret agents. This was a very dangerous job. They had to find out all they could so they could help the Allies. The most famous SOE members were Villette Szabo and Odette Churchill (“Women in World War II”). These women were given the highest bravery award, the George Cross. Women also worked as entertainers in the military. They would perform for the troops. The two most famous entertainers of war were Vera Lynn and Gracie Fields. Overall, 460,000 women served in the Military and 6.5 million in Civilian work (“Women in World War II”). Without the help of the women in the military, we would have not been able to fight as well as we did. The women working in World War II made our military…show more content…
The government decided to start a propaganda campaign to get women working to help with the war. They promoted “Rosie the Riveter” as the ideal woman worker: loyal, efficient, patriotic, and pretty. (Sorensen 3) The campaign was a success because the women stepped in to take the factory jobs that the men left behind when they went off to war. The women took jobs such as making ammunition, uniforms, and air planes. They were also doing jobs such as welding, riveting and engine repair. During World War II, over 6 million women took wartime jobs in factories or farms ("Women in World War II”). They were helping meet the wartime production for planes, tanks, ships, and weapons. Without the women working, the United States would not have been able to keep up with the wartime production of weapons. Some women worked so long in the factories that they had to move closer to the factory. They got paid well, however men doing the same work as skilled women got paid more. That was not fair for the women. They struggled with discrimination, harassment, and physical pain from long hours and poor working conditions. Once the war was over and the men came home, the women had to give up their jobs and these hard-working women did not want to leave their jobs. Even though the women were not treated as well as the men, they did prove that they were just as capable as
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