William Hoy: The Best Baseball Player

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Every so often in history a star is born. Often, what makes that individual shine so bright is not their achievements and abilities, but sometimes the person they are inside and the feats he/she has to overcome. William "Dummy" Hoy was one such example. He was not only one of the greatest ball players of his time, but he molded and shaped the sport of baseball into what it is today. Born in Findlay, Ohio in 1862, William Hoy was the son of a local shoemaker (Wright). At the age of two he lost his hearing after being diagnosed with spinal meningitis. Hoy grew up in Ohio and attended school at the Ohio School for the Deaf (Tossman). In 1885 he made the important decision to make a living off of baseball after gaining four hits on a professional…show more content…
By the end of his Rookie year Hoy led the National League in stolen bases (82), set a fielding record for the Senators that still stands today, and was the first major-league player in history, from the outfield, to throw out three base runners at the home plate (an achievement that even today has only been done by a total of three players in baseball history) (WebHostGroup.net). In 1890 Hoy played for the St. Louis Browns, one of the top teams of the season, and led the entire league with the most walks (119) and the Browns with the most runs (136). After moving back to the Senators for sometime Hoy was then transferred to the Cincinnati Reds in 1894 where he would spend the next four years of his career (Tossman). The fans in Cincinnati loved Hoy and the feeling was mutual. Hoy enjoyed Cincinnati so much that he made it his off-season home (Wright). By 1898 Hoy was playing for the Louisville Colonels and it was for them that he gave them his best season ever with a batting average of .318 (Wright). On May 1, 1901, ‘Dummy’ was the first player in baseball history to hit a grand slam home…show more content…
Matthew Moore, president of the William Ellsworth Hoy Committee, a large organization fighting strong to get Hoy into the Baseball Hall of Fame, states that “[Dummy] deserves this not… because he is deaf, but because he was a great baseball player in his time. He was a gentleman and a very helpful and decent human being” (Wright). Hoy was not just a baseball player he was a legend. On April 8, 2001, Gallaudet University dedicated its baseball field in honor of Hoy (Balaz Internet). “To the deaf community, Hoy is also a hero who was able to break down the barriers between the hearing and the hearing-impaired, a task that was difficult to achieve in the early twentieth century, when society was less accepting of the handicapped” (Wright). Like all other bright stars in history “Dummy” Hoy and his legacy will live on well into the coming
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