Wild Cat Falling Belonging Analysis

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Humans have indeed used texts as mediums in order to portray what they conceive to be universal life messages and experiences to their audiences. Behind every text is an intention, a purpose of why the author writes, whether its a reflection of their time or to explore ideological perspectives. Texts that are written with these intentions are Wild Cat Falling written by Mudrooroo and the film, Mississippi Burning directed by Alan Parker. They both explore ethnocentrism and discuss/portray their experiences with racial prejudice in 1960s Australia and America. Racial prejudice, with the given context of 1960s Australia/America, is when a person thinks, acts and or speaks about another race in a negative matter, basing their actions on what race…show more content…
It discusses other ideas associated with racial prejudice such as the effects of a social hierarchy. Mississippi Burning, likewise to Wild Cat Falling, explores how the ‘coloured’ people were being racially discriminated and prejudiced against since the white Americans too, had an ethnocentric perspective on their coloured neighbours. A quote that supports the concept of ethnocentrism is, “he wasn’t doing anything except be a negro”. The diction of negro creates a tone of anger in the quote which helps illustrates the same concept of, if you’re black then you will be excluded, denied public facilities and racially prejudiced by the white society. Furthermore the tone creates an authentic voice which helps illustrate to the audience the African Americans anger and frustration towards the concept and from being racially prejudiced against in general. Likewise to the Aboriginals, regardless of their personal characteristic and personality, the African American would be labelled as an uneducated, unhygienic and less important to the whites due to ethnocentrism. This explicitly shows the effects of a social hierarchy, since the African Americans are at the bottom of the hierarchy, they’re treated as a race of no importance and value, which further highlights the racial prejudice that the African Americans suffer from. Alan Parker has utilized his text, Mississippi…show more content…
Racial prejudice was out of control in the 1960s and was heavily practiced due to the corrupt authority. Law enforcement, judges, juries, mayors and anyone with power and influence are all contributors to corrupt authority in 1960s Australia as they often ignored the sinister actions being committed towards the Aboriginal community and or didn’t discourage it but rather encouraged it. An example of the idea corrupt authority being expressed in the novel is, “They make the law so chaps like me can’t help breaking it what ever we do and the likes of you can hardly break it if you try”. The hyperbole creates a vivid image that the Aboriginals are being punished for innocuous ‘crimes’ such as not giving up their seat for an white person or even for merely stepping on a white person’s shadow. The fact that these petty actions are punishable and are actually administrated by authorities highlights its corrupt state as well as how racial prejudice exists in every aspect of society. This further supports the idea that the white society has an ethnocentric perspective on the Aboriginals, as they have evaluated them to not be of any importance and not worthy of doing anything that connects them to the whites due to their unique customs, traditions and culture. Hence with the reasons stated, Mudrooroo has successfully used his text, Wild Cat Falling as a medium to portray his
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