Why Is The Louisiana Purchase Important

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Robert Groom Professor Sanchez History V07A 26 November 2012 Most Important Event in U.S. History 1620-1865 “The Louisiana Purchase” The most important event in the history of the United States of America, 1620-1865 was The Louisiana Purchase. Next to winning our national independence, the purchase of the Louisiana territory had the largest influence on the development of our great nation. In October of 1803 Thomas Jefferson, the President of the United States, purchased the vast Louisiana territory from the French. The United States acquired Louisiana from France over 190 years ago. On April 30, 1803, one of the greatest real estate deals in history took place - one that would double the size of the country and put the United States…show more content…
They include the following states: Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Wyoming, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Colorado and Montana as well as this country gaining a vast wealth of natural resources. The Louisiana Purchase: how it was and as it is. This country, without a doubt, would not be the superpower it is today without the acquisition of this land. The gold miners would find wealth, the farmers would find a plot of fertile land to call their own, and the United States itself would double in size. The nation acquired eight-hundred and twenty-eight thousand square miles west of the Mississippi river. Since no one knew exactly how big the territory of Louisiana was, President Jefferson who as early as 1803 had arranged for congressional funding for a secret scientific and military mission into Spanish and Indian Territory, as to try and undermine relations the Indians had with the Spanish and the French whenever possible. This was to open direct dealings between Indians and the United States. So with this support after the completed purchase in 1804 sent his personal secretary 28 year old Meriwether Lewis and his friend Kentuckian William Clark, who was a veteran of the 1790’s Indian wars to explore the lands west of the Mississippi River, to establish relations, survey and take down notes on what they…show more content…
The Virginian’s commitment to opportunity and progress, to openness and frugality, offered a stark contrast in approach and style to the policies to all those that proceeded him. The national expansion did however allow some of the conventional social institutions of the time, such as white farmers, entrepreneurs, and adventurous pioneers to take advantage of the new opportunities the expansion policies offered. Although It also put an added strain on Presidents popularity in the North and with some politicians, due to the fact that the Jeffersonian spirit was more of a promise and a hope of the future, than a solid commitment, and that President Jefferson’s vision of the future of this new republic unfortunately due to the lack of any civil liberties excluded some of the countries citizens mainly women, slaves, and non-white free
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