Why Is The Atomic Bomb Wrong

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Atomic Bomb The atomic bombs of the 1940s were some of the most cutting edge technology for the time period. The creation and eventual use of such a weapon is widely disputed as morally wrong. In the history of warfare, only two nuclear weapons have ever been detonated offensively. It was during the Second World War that the United States became a world power, thanks in a large part to its monopoly on atomic weapons. The atomic bomb is a weapon with great explosive power that results form the sudden release of energy upon the splitting, or fission of the nuclei (World War 2 Database). This new destructive force wrecked havoc on two Japanese cities and caused the end of World War II. It also saved thousands of American lives because a ground…show more content…
The decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japanese citizens in August, 1945, as a means to bring the long Pacific war to an end could be justified-militarily, politically and morally, by such points as follow suit (The National Security Archive). The goal of waging war is victory with minimum losses on one's own side and, if possible, on the enemy's side. No one disputes the fact that the Japanese military was prepared to fight to the last man to defend the home islands, and indeed had already demonstrated this determination in previous Pacific island campaigns (Sherrow 56). A weapon originally developed to contain a Nazi atomic project was available that would spare Americans hundreds of thousands of causalities in an invasion of Japan, and-not incidentally-save several times more than that among Japanese soldiers and civilians (World War 2 Database). The thousands who have died in the bombings on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were far less than those who would have died in an allied invasion, and their sudden deaths convinced the Japanese military to surrender (The National Security…show more content…
In other words, the moral issues to not use nuclear warfare fails to meet the argument for dropping the bomb and changes the subject from the immediate decision to the long-term consequences of the decision (Truman Library). But even if one grants the point about fear of annihilation, it is not clear that the world has fundamentally changed nor that the whole world is always in danger of nations from time immemorial. For example, ancient Rome sacked Carthage, plowed it under and salted the earth (Sherrow 72). Medieval and modern religious wars have annihilated millions. More recently, there was Hitler's genocidal six-million-death final solution to the Jewish problem, and the Communists' ten of millions of mass murders continue to this day. All this has been done without benefit of nuclear power. Many made comments came at the beginning of the atomic or nuclear age, and while the source and the judgment deserve respect, experience has shown that nuclear power in Western hands deterred a third world war and ultimately caused the collapse of the greatest
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