Who Is Andrew Jackson The First Populist

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Carlos Lizotte History 2111 November 3, 2009 Dr. Matthew Jennings Democracy for the common folk The self-made man, Andrew Jackson was the first populist that used his “common folk” image to gain political ground. As a general he never asked his men to endure more than he had to. He became a war hero at the battle of New Orleans in 1815. Andrew Jackson became president in 1828 after the controversial election of 1824. In 1824, he won the popular vote and won more electoral votes that his opponent John Quincy Adams. He did not receive 140 electoral votes so the decision was left to the House of Representatives. The speaker of the House, Henry Clay, was in favor of Adams and with Clays followers; Adams took office in what…show more content…
He took it upon himself that everything being done for the good of the Union. Over all things, he was an American. He spared no use of the presidential power to veto and during his time in office, he vetoed a total of 12 bills, three more than all the past presidents put together. By using the veto in this way, Jackson forced the legislation to take the course that he thought was proper. Such acts on his behalf would provoke conservatives. His opposition was outraged and blamed him for abuse of power. The nickname King Andrew I circulated among the anti-Jacksonians. His followers however, praised him for winning back their…show more content…
He feared that a few men had too much power and were irresponsible to the people. He believed a bank was simply a step toward corruption. He said, it made “the rich richer and the potent more powerful”. After vetoing the bank’s re-charter he knew the bank was dying but not dying fast enough. Impatient to see the bank collapse, he withdrew all the federal deposits in the bank and deposited the revenues in numerous state banks controlled by fellow Democrats. Jackson exclaimed, “The bank wants to kill me, but I will kill it!” His actions would eventually bring great economic distress. The economic turmoil didn’t occur until after Jackson left office, leaving the consequences to his successor Martin Van Buren. He believed his actions were justified because he was doing what the people wanted. Andrew Jackson’s messages to Congress on December 7, 1829 suggest the Native Americans should be moved out west of the Mississippi. The Indian removal as we know it is a violation of Human rights. “All men are created equal” with the exception of blacks, Indians, and any other
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