What Is Ww2 A Turning Point In The Civil Rights Movement

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To what extent do you consider that World War Two was a key turning point in the campaign for civil rights for African-Americans in the period 1877-1981? The advancement of the civil rights campaign for African Americans developed through many significant events, however, World War Two can be said to have the greatest significance; even more than the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments and other reforms which gave blacks civil rights. This is because the Second World War highlighted the tribulation that coloured people faced and the extent of the discrimination and began to change the ‘separate but not equal’ laws when logically both races were fighting and dying for the same cause. More over, the Second World War for the first time gave black…show more content…
The previous mentality of the Accommodationist was rapidly diminishing amongst blacks as they no longer wanted to accept the status quo nor accept that inequality was God’s will. However, as ‘‘racially motivated violence had become part of the way of life in the South’ . World War 2 can not be accounted for as the key turning point in the civil rights movement just because it increased black consciousness and activities in the North. Other factors and key leading figures in the civil rights campaign can be seen as more prominent in the civil rights campaign. These include the achievements: of Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People l (NAACP). The Ruling of BROWN (1954) overturning PLESSY V. Ferguson made any form of discrimination and segregation unconstitutional and illegal while the events of Little Rock forced the Government to enforce BROWN more diligently. Personalities such as Martin Luther King greatly…show more content…
The bravery of Rosa Parks inspired the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, which is a major key turning point because it showed the importance of black people in the economy; one million dollars was lost during the 1 year boycott. Non-violent methods of Gandhi adopted by King, also helped the movement spread and gain respect from Federal Government and even non blacks. King’s Ideology helped influence more organizations such as the success of the Greensboro sit-in by the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). This is a key turning point as it leads to the desegregation of public places. Use of technology in the civil rights campaign is also a key turning point for the campaign as during the 60’s further advancements were made by national broadcasts showing ill treatment of activist in places such as Birmingham and Selma in Alabama, expanding further support for the Civil rights campaign internationally. James Farmer claimed “we felt we could count on the racists of the South to create a crisis so that the federal Government would be compelled to enforce the law” Along with this, Kings motivational ‘I have a dream’ speech in Washington DC 1963 can be argued to be the key factor as it leads to the Civil Rights Act of 1965. King has a significant role in the civil
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