Explain Piaget's Stage Of Cognitive Thought?

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I’ve taken the pre-assessment, now what? If you have not yet taken the pre­assessment and are just ‘peeking’­ please go ahead and preview the course and take the pre­assessment­ we will be here waiting for you. Congratulations on completing the pre­assessment for C217­­ this is a great step along the path to success in this course. Below you will find a guided study plan to help you refine your studying as you progress toward the objective assessment. This guide is not a substitute for a thorough reading of the material ­­ it is just to help you identify areas to critically think about so you can be successful in this course. Start by taking a look at your coaching report­ you’ll see the following areas listed with your…show more content…
Describe theories of development of thought, memory, and language. Explain the role of education in cognitive development. Explain Piaget’s stage of preoperational thought. Contrast physical growth rates in infancy with that during the early childhood period. In the first several days of life, most newborns lose 5 to 7 percent of their body weight before they adjust to feeding by sucking, swallowing, and digesting. Then they grow rapidly, gaining an average of 5 to 6 ounces per week during the first month. They have doubled their birth weight by the age of 4 months and have nearly tripled it by their first birthday. Infants grow about 1 inch per month during the first year, approximately doubling their birth length by their first birthday. Growth slows considerably in the second year of life (Burns & others, 2013). By 2 years of age, infants weigh approximately 26 to 32 pounds, having gained a quarter to half a pound per month during the second year to reach about one­fifth of their adult weight. At 2 years of age, infants average 32 to 35 inches in height, which is nearly half of their adult height. What are some recommendations for families of young children in each of these areas?…show more content…
What are the main conclusions drawn from research regarding the effect of memory/cognition training? Contrast these theories: Activity theory ­ states that the more active and involved older adults are, the more likely they are to be satisfied with their lives. Socio­emotional selectivity theory ­ states that older adults become more selective about their social networks. Because they place a high value on emotional satisfaction, older adults spend more time with familiar individuals with whom they have had rewarding relationships. Selective optimization with compensation theory ­ states that successful aging depends on three main factors: selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC). The theory describes how people can produce new resources and allocate them effectively to the tasks they want to master. Selection is based on the concept that older adults have a reduced capacity and loss of functioning, which require a reduction in performance in most life domains. Optimization suggests that it is possible to maintain performance in some areas through continued practice and the use of new technologies.
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