W. L. M. William Aberhart: An Analysis

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The Great Depression was unexpected, yet inevitable. The stock market prices were inflated to nearly breaking point, but there were no actions to show for it. Eventually, people started to realize nothing was resulting from all the stock buying - and panicked. Everyone started selling as much as they could, as fast as they could so they could still make some profit. The major economic figures of the time tried to sustain the stock market by investing all they could, but to no avail - the prices took a huge tumble, and it would be a long time before they would manage to rise up again. "The Depression altered established perceptions of the economy and the role of the state."1 Several influential political figures - J. S. Woodsworth, W. L. M.…show more content…
Aberhart was the Social Credit Premier of Alberta from 1935 to 1943. His explanation for the Great Depression was that people simply did not have enough money to sustain themselves. Therefore, his suggestion was to give everybody $25 a month, to purchase necessities. According to Aberhart, if every citizen received $25, then the whole economic system could be saved. The employers would have money, so they wouldn't have to lay off any workers; the workers would have money so they would be able to purchase consumer products, and so on. This proposition was obviously quite flawed: how many of the citizens would really use the money to buy 'necessities'? How much of the government's money would be wasted before they realized this was not going to work? Thankfully, the citizens of Canada(or rather, Alberta) never found out - Aberhart's idea of 'Social Credit' never did garner much reception, and so he did not have a chance to put his idea into…show more content…
He wished for the government to step in and take control. With the government to influence the economy, inflation would be suppressed, interest rates would be kept low, and everyone would be happy - or so Woodsworth claimed. Not only would the government control formerly privatized banks, they would also implement policies such as unemployment insurance, welfare, pension, and compensation. This plan relied heavily on a 'trustworthy' government, since all economic matters would be taken care of by the current political party in rule. If the government was 'corrupt', or if they didn't put enough attention on issues of concern, once again, the country would be in trouble. Woodsworth had a good idea that could work out to save the economy - but only if the government was very
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