Violence In Lord Of The Flies

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Lusting after the acquisition of power and having control over others, as well as using violence as a means to achieve it, is all a part of human nature. Throughout history, powerful figures have been feared because of some privileges they may have had. These figures used this fear and abused it in order to maintain or get more power. Clearly, violence evokes terror and apprehension over a person and allows the feared to overpower and dictate a person’s actions, mindset, and emotions. The use of fear and intensity by a feared figure compels people to subconsciously act in a certain way. In Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, while all the boys are with Jack’s tribe and people are mobbing about, acting, and chanting, the boys notice something,…show more content…
Their minds were crowded by their roles; it’s like they forgot who they were. They behaved… as real prisoners (Stanford Prison Experiment). The guards truly got into their roles as well, to say the least, and provoked the prisoners into behaving differently than was normal for them. The guards treated the other volunteers as real prisoners and in turn, the volunteers ended up behaving like real prisoners. In the experiment, there was one prisoner in particular that wished to withdraw. The prisoner started believing that this was no longer an experiment but was stuck in a real prison. He also believed that the other inmates would verbalize their distaste and call him a traitor for leaving. The prisoner cried but when told that he was in an experiment and could definitely leave if he chose to, he froze. And, he did so because upon realizing he was free to do as he pleased, it was as if a veil had been removed from his sight and he seemed to break character, the role he was playing. He acted differently because of not just his environment but because of the violence that was there. He couldn’t stand the abuse of the guards and other inmates and forgot that he was merely a student volunteering for an…show more content…
Towards the end of the book, Lord of the Flies, an officer shows up on the island where the boys were living, “Ralph looked at him dumbly. For a moment he had a fleeting picture of the strange glamour that had once invested the beaches. But the island was scorched up like dead wood- Simon was dead- and Jack had… the tears began to flow and sobs shook him… and in the middle of them with filthy body, matted hair, and unwiped nose, Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man’s heart, and the fall through the air of a true, wise friend called Piggy” (Golding 202). Ralph was snapped back to reality and seemed to fully understand what had happened and what was happening. Before he felt almost normal about what had been happening but that changed. The violence was over and he was finally enveloped in a sense of
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