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'Violence Breeds Violence.' in Light of This Comment, Consider Emily Bronte's Presentation of Violence in the Novel. Essay

  • Submitted by: Ginny1
  • on April 10, 2014
  • Category: English
  • Length: 1,193 words

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Below is an essay on "'Violence Breeds Violence.' in Light of This Comment, Consider Emily Bronte's Presentation of Violence in the Novel." from Anti Essays, your source for research papers, essays, and term paper examples.

'Violence breeds violence.' In light of this comment, consider Emily Bronte's presentation of violence in the novel.

Violence can be defined as an instance of violent treatment or procedure affecting either someones physical or emotional stability. This is represented by Emily Bronte throughout 'Wuthering Heights,' through the use of language, structure and form. We see certain relationships such as Heathcliff and Hindley, and Heathcliff and Hareton which support the idea that 'violence breeds violence.' However, in contrast, we also see relationships with Heathcliff and Catherine, Edgar and Isabella that present more of an idea that love breeds violence, as opposed to violence itself.

Most of the novels violence centralises around Heathcliff, stemming from a desire to claim revenge against Hindley due to his initial hatred and systematic degradation of Heathcliff and his social status. Hindley's hatred and violent approach to Heathcliff is evident as soon as they meet, in chapter IV Hindley orders Heathcliff 'take my colt, gipsy...I pray that he may break your neck; take him and be damned, you beggarly interloper!' Hindleys wish of Heathcliff's death, shows Hindley's sheer anger, disgust and hatred toward Heathcliff. The use of religious language 'pray' and 'damned' further exaggerates this point as it displays how Hindley feels his level of hate cannot be expressed using common language, as, like religion, it transcends our world. We also see Hindley become tyrannical in chapter VI where he begins to systematically degrade Heathcliff into becoming that of a much lower class than the rest of the Earnshaws. 'He drove him from their company to the servants, deprived him of the instructions of the curate, and insisted that he should labour out of doors instead..as hard as any other lad on the farm,' this use of listing emphasises all of Heathcliff's losses at Hindleys demand and makes it seem unending. Furthermore, the use of the colloquial word 'lad;' which...

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MLA Citation

"'Violence Breeds Violence.' in Light of This Comment, Consider Emily Bronte's Presentation of Violence in the Novel.". Anti Essays. 22 Oct. 2018

<https://www.antiessays.com/free-essays/Violence-Breeds-Violence-In-Light-Of-606828.html>

APA Citation

'Violence Breeds Violence.' in Light of This Comment, Consider Emily Bronte's Presentation of Violence in the Novel.. Anti Essays. Retrieved October 22, 2018, from the World Wide Web: https://www.antiessays.com/free-essays/Violence-Breeds-Violence-In-Light-Of-606828.html