Upton Sinclair's The Jungle

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The Jungle Imagine a Darwin-esque world where ultra-competitiveness and amorality reign supreme. A world where the adage ‘survival of the fittest’ is no longer just a metaphor, but a chilling reality; where a person might literally perish if they are not able to find work, beg, or fight their way to shelter. This was a very real place for thousands of people at the turn of the last century, exemplified best in Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. Jurgis Rudkus, Ona, and their family of ten more emigrate from Lithuania to Chicago in search of the American Dream. Unfortunately, they get swept up in the all-encompassing packing machine that is Packingtown only to have everything they’ve ever hoped for crushed. Their fate was that of countless other…show more content…
These, however, were just out of reach for those in the times of The Jungle, and were perhaps even influenced by it. Even so, they did not address the major issues of immigrants, such as low wages, poor working conditions, and health care. When Jurgis is living in the country, he stops at a farm. He is offered work, but only through the fall. The farmer asks why he cannot find work in the cities in the winter, and Jurgis explains that everyone crowds to the cities in search of work. The attitude of the farmer reflects that of the majority of Americans, who did not understand the plight of the immigrant. American society valued life, but not that of the recent…show more content…
It led to the Pure Food and Drug Act, which eventually led to the creation of the Food and Drug Administration. Unfortunately, we, as a country and as a people, are still far from putting the health and wellbeing of the individual over the bottom line profit. The Jungle begs the questions: what are we being kept in the dark about today? What are our fellow human beings being put through so that we may purchase inexpensive goods? What are we
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