Unit 7 M2

964 Words4 Pages
Schizophrenia has been described as a disintegration of the personality. It has a main feature of a split between thinking and emotion, and involves a range of psychotic symptoms, where there is a break from reality. Schizophrenic patients usually lack insight into their condition. Schizophrenia follows a pattern of positive symptoms including hallucinations, delusions, disorganised speech, and catatonic behaviour. It follows a pattern of negative symptoms including affective flattening, which refers to a lack of emotion, alogia, which refers to an unwillingness to speak, and avolition, which refers to an inability to direct own acitivites. There have been issues identified surrounding the diagnosis of schizophrenia. Rosenhan questioned…show more content…
However, the risk of developing schizophrenia rises with the degree of genetic relatedness. A child of someone with schizophrenia has a thirteen per cent concordance rate. A D.Z twin has a concordance rate of seventeen per cent, whereas M.Z twins have a concordance rate of 48 per cent. However, the fact that the concordance rate for M.Z twins is not one hundred per cent suggests that there must be some kind of environmental factors in the development of…show more content…
Dopamine drugs also do not benefit all sufferers of schizophrenia. They also tend to work on positive symptoms, suggesting that the dopamine hypothesis cannot be the entire explanation for the development of schizophrenia. It has also been suggested that schizophrenia may be a structural abnormality within the brain. Stevens indicates that many schizophrenic patients display symptoms of neurological disease, including decreased levels of eye blinking, a lack of the blink reflex poor visual pursuits and poor pupil reactions to light. Researchers have found that a large number of schizophrenics have enlarged ventricles, which are cavities in the brain which supply nutrients and remove waste. For example, Torrey found that the ventricles of schizophrenics are fifteen per cent larger than normal. Meyer Lindberg examined the brain activity of schizophrenics whilst engaged on a working memory task. It was found that their prefrontal cortex showed reduced activation, which reflected their poor performance. At the same time, dopamine levels were elevated, which suggests that a dysfunction with the prefrontal cortex is linked to dopamine
Open Document