Unit 5 Principles Of Safeguarding And Protection In Health And Social Care

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Unit 5: Principles of Safeguarding and Protection in Health and Social Care 1. Know how to recognise signs of abuse Abuse is the violation of an individual's human and civil rights by any other person or persons. It can vary from the seemingly trivial act of not treating someone with dignity and respect to extreme punishment, cruelty or torture. The commonly recognized forms of abuse are Physical, Emotional, Financial, Sexual, Neglect and Institutional. Physical abuse can occur where there is no satisfactory explanation, definite knowledge, or a reasonable suspicion that injury was inflicted with intent, caused through lack of care by the person having custody, charge or care of that person. The following list may be indicators…show more content…
Some people are more vulnerable than others due to disability, illness or age and may be unable to protect themselves from being harmed. Some have difficulty making their wishes and feelings known and this may make them vulnerable to abuse. A vulnerable adult means any person aged 18 years or over who may need help due to learning/physical or sensory disability, frailty due to age, mental health problems or dementia, drug/alcohol problem , physical illness or brain injury. Vulnerable adults are people who are at greater than normal risk of abuse. Older people, especially those who are unwell, frail, confused and unable either to stand up for themselves or keep track of their affairs, are vulnerable. Abuse can happen to older people in their home, in hospital, nursing and residential homes. Older people who are most at risk of abuse at home…show more content…
The independent Safeguarding Authority has been created to help prevent unsuitable people from working with vulnerable adults or children. Following the murders of Jessica Chapman and Holly Wells by Ian Huntley (a school caretaker) in 2003, the Bichard Inquiry was commissioned. One of the issues this Inquiry looked at was the way employers recruit people to work with children and vulnerable adults. It asked whether the way employers check the background of job applicants is reliable enough. It also asked whether employers should be responsible for deciding whether a job applicant can be safely employed. The inquiry’s recommendations led to the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006, which recognised the need for a single agency to vet all individuals who want to work or volunteer with vulnerable people. The ISA was created to fulfil this role across England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (Scotland is developing its own similar system, which will work closely with the
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