Uniformly Accelerated Movement

997 Words4 Pages
Uniformly Accelerated Movement Abstract Acceleration is defined as the rate of change of velocity with respect to time in a given direction. Uniformly accelerated movement is movement that always has the same acceleration, meaning that it is a constant force; the force of gravity is the classic example. We will prove that acceleration with a constant force of gravity can help determine velocity and distance at a certain time using derived basic equations. The data collected determines a 3.78% of error that proves the equations are correct, and that its value could have been affected by errors in the process. 1 Introduction Acceleration is defined as the rate of change of velocity with respect to time in a given direction. It is a vector quantity that is defined as the rate at which an object changes its velocity [3]. An object is accelerating if it is changing its velocity. The next equations describe velocity and acceleration: a = v/s (1) where v = m/ s (2) where m = distance in meters; s = time in seconds. Since acceleration is a vector quantity it has magnitude and direction [3]. Uniformly accelerated movement (UAM) is movement that always has the same acceleration, meaning that it has a constant equal force. An object with a constant acceleration should not be confused with an object with a constant velocity; an object with a constant velocity is not accelerating. The perfect example of constant force is gravity (g Earth = 9.81 m/s2), which is the force of attraction between all masses in the universe, and in this cases specially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface [4]. If an object is held motionless in a uniform gravitational field it will fall in a constant acceleration, this means that every second that the object falls its velocity will

More about Uniformly Accelerated Movement

Open Document