Twelfth Night Characters Analysis

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Study Guides Hamlet Julius Caesar King Henry IV King Lear Macbeth Merchant of Venice Othello Romeo and Juliet The Tempest Twelfth Night Trivia Authorship Bard Facts Bibliography Biography FAQ Films Globe Theatre Pictures Quiz Timeline Visitor Survey Click here! Twelfth Night characters analysis features noted Shakespeare scholar William Hazlitt's famous critical essay about Twelfth Night's characters. THIS is justly considered as one of the most delightful of Shakespear's comedies. It is full of sweetness and pleasantry. It is perhaps too good-natured for comedy. It has little satire, and no spleen. It aims at the ludicrous rather than the ridiculous. It makes us laugh at the follies of mankind, not despise them, and still less bear any ill-will towards them. Shakespear's comic genius resembles the bee rather in its power of extracting sweets from weeds or poisons, than in leaving a sting behind it. He gives the most amusing exaggeration of the prevailing foibles of his characters, but in a way that they themselves, instead of being offended at, would almost join in to humour; he rather contrives opportunities for them to shew themselves off in the happiest lights, than renders them contemptible in the perverse construction of the wit or malice of others.-There is a certain stage of society in which people become conscious of their peculiarities and absurdities, affect to disguise what they are, and set up pretensions to what they are not. This gives rise to a corresponding style of comedy, the object of which is to detect the disguises of self-love, and to make reprisals on these preposterous assumptions of vanity, by marking the contrast between the real and the affected character as severely as possible, and denying to those, who would impose on us for what they arenot, even the merit which they have. This is the comedy of
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