Transcending Cultures Through Theatre

994 Words4 Pages
Throughout history, theatre has been an element in culture and society altogether. It evolved from a mere form of entertainment to an art as well, gradually shifting and forming. Famous playwrights emerged; famous productions were showered in gratitude. Yet, no production is truly alike. However, as ideas contrast and compare so does theatre. Theatre rose from early times, back to the days of Ancient Greece in auditoriums of stone and dreams. Drama advanced, leading into the medieval age, sparking Elizabethan theatre and Kabuki theatre. Despite large differences between the two, Elizabethan and Kabuki theatre can be compared and contrasted to display influences on one another's cultures. This is firstly as cause of the similarity in the plays’ overall themes. As well, the similarity in drama and acting styles plays a role in this. Lastly, the overall similar effects of each type of theatre over that specific culture are vital to influence. It is clear that Elizabethan and Kabuki theatre can be compared and contrasted to display influences on one another’s cultures because of the similarity in the plays’ overall themes. Several instances can be put to use to support this claim. Firstly, the two variations of theatre share common genres and themes. Both consist mainly of tragedies, comedies, romances, and tales of war. For instance, the Shakespearian tragedy Romeo and Juliet is alike in many factors to the kabuki tragedy The Love Suicides (3 Shively). The two involve star-crossed lovers whose love is inevitably destroyed by suicide. The general story of star-crossed lovers is an ancient one, and this leads us to believe that both plays come from similar influences. “Like A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the tale of Romeo and Juliet has acquired the status of a myth, but credit for this is not due to Shakespeare alone. Before he wrote, there had been numerous versions of
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