Too Err Is Human Summary

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Barry Folland In 2000 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released its report “ Too Err is Human”, citing that as many as 98,000 people die per annum from medical errors and attributes to the eighth leading cause of death. The cost is estimated at between $17 and $29 billion a year, of which health care costs are one half. The Department of Health and Human Services did a survey in 2010 and found that 180,000 people die per year as a result of medical errors and infections. The health care industry has been behind a decade or more in attention to assuring basic safety. Safety is a critical first step in improving quality of healthcare. Another critical step is to create an environment that encourages reporting of medical errors so that…show more content…
One thing that the profession needs to do is to stop the blame game and start to devise ways to report and reduce med errors. The culture of fear that exists now is actually counterproductive in reducing the causes of med errors. Many of them go unreported due to this culture of fear and persecution. One thing that resonates throughout the literature associated with this subject is that we are all human and that mistakes are inevitable, especially when the above factors are put into…show more content…
The mission of the AHRQ is to “improve quality safety efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare for all Americans”. Information from their research allows people to make informed decisions regarding their medical care and improve the quality of services. The Joint Commission has recommended that a culture of safety be created. Stressing that organizations should have “transparent and equitable disciplinary process that takes into account personal responsibility and accountability.” TJC noted two major actions that erode leadership credibility and undermine the culture of safety; terminating or failing to support an employee who committed a blameless act during the course of an adverse event (med error), and exempting influential individuals from complying with quality and safety policies, such as policies on intimidating and disruptive behavior, (playing favorites). TJC has also been instrumental in creating the “do not use” list of abbreviations and the sound a like warnings for
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