To What Extent Was the Vietnam War Part of the Cold War?

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To what extent was the Vietnam part of the Cold War? | | | | | | | | The Vietnam War can be seen to be part of the Cold War due to the Americans acting upon their policy of containment and their fear of the Domino Theory. This idea relates to many events in the Cold War. For example the Korean War, where the Americans became involved due to their fear of the Domino Theory, as communism had already spread in China and Indo-China, and now the Soviet-occupied North Korea had attacked the South. The US felt they had no other choice but to act on their policy of containment and fear of the Domino Theory. The Vietnam War also brought about worries of the Domino Theory, as communism was already present in the North, and so they wished to prevent it from spreading to neighboring countries e.g. Laos and Cambodia and evidently also the South. This is the main reason as to why the Americans began to become involved in the Vietnam War. Therefore, the Vietnam War can be said to be part of the Cold War due to the Americans acting upon their policy of containment and fear of the Domino Theory. However, the Vietnam War can be said to not be part of the Cold War due to its origins not being from communist and capitalist disputes, this is simply why the US became involved. Unlike other events in the Cold War, for example the Berlin Airlift (where Stalin blockaded East Berlin from the West due to the prosperity stemming from capitalism in West Berlin and Germany) and the Korean war (where the communist north attacked the South that was occupied by a US military administration, therefore making it anti-communist). The origins the Vietnam War were due to unresolved Vietnamese problems, for example the creation of a power vacuum due to the withdrawal of France in March 1954. This led to the Geneva Agreements, where Vietnam was divided along the 17th Parallel. It
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