To Kill A Mockingbird Scout's Growth

1231 Words5 Pages
Scout’s Growth In the development of children, their surroundings will often shape their personalities. And in turn, they mimic other people’s personalities. As the character of Scout is being introduced, the injustice of the south is revealed along with her growing up. Maycomb’s tendencies towards stereotypes and ignorance to the truth are shown by Lee in many of the novel’s minor characters. With Scout being in contact with them, she is also exposed to the “southern way of life”. In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee suggests that Scout’s response to the beliefs or behaviours of others is often shaped by her connection to other people. Lee uses the character of Atticus to show that with his moral teachings, Scout matures into adolescence…show more content…
This allowed her to become unlike the rest of the town. Atticus has given many teachings to his children but the most important one is outlined twice in the novel. Atticus summarizes that the essential component of attempting to understand a person is that “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view. Until you climb into his skin and walk around in it” (39). This quote is outlined twice in the novel because Atticus understands people’s opinions by looking from their perspective. Many of the discriminatory characters in the story do not have that skill. Atticus also teaches Scout not to fight. He told her that “he would wear me out if he had of me fighting anymore...the better everybody would be. I soon forgot” (99). Scout thinks that power is the most important trait to have, but Atticus shows that an individual does not have to have power in order to solve a problem. Another moral is that courage is not through manliness. The children’s endeavour with Mrs. Dubose has allowed Atticus to show them the true meaning of courage; he says “I wanted you to see what real courage is...and you see it through no matter what” (149). The Finch children previously thought that courage is in the form of masculinity and control, but Atticus teaches the children that courage is not always so. These lessons of Atticus show that Scout…show more content…
When Alexandra confronts her about the Cunninghams, she judges the Cunnighams based on their family status, saying, “Don't be silly Jean Louise... women aren't interested in that kind of people.” (300). The significance of this is that Alexandra shows her ignorant views by saying that even if Walter is perfect in every physical way, his heritage brands him to be inferior to their family. While Scout believes that people are not related to their heritage, the rest of the town shows that the status of an individual is bound to their initial families. This is shown when Ms. Merriweather complains that it was the Robinson family’s fault that Tom was convicted “Thing that church ought to do is...they grumbled all day after that trial” (309-310). Scout learned that Ms. Merriweather thinks Helen Robinson should be reprimanded because it is her skin color and her unfaithfulness to the church that caused their misfortune. The group of ladies that form the church circle should be an open-minded group, but they have only shown to be insensitive and unsympathetic. The full maturation of Scout is shown when she thinks to herself on the Radley porch, “Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shows and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.” (374). Scout fully understood
Open Document