Thesis On Runaway Slavery

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Runaway Slaves Slavery in the United States first began when Dutch ships brought Africans to North America. Slaves were much cheaper than indentured servant, yet still did the same work such as harvesting tobacco, rice and indigo crops for the South. In 1793, the cotton gin was created which was the uprising of the South’s economy. Slaves helped build the economic foundations of this county by doing this labor. Slavery wasn’t very well liked in the North. The abolitionist thought it was un-godly to be owning, using and treating a human being as an animal, and putting them out in the fields to do hard labor. It was a different story in the South. Southerners saw slavery as a way of life. It was natural to own a slave. The South owning…show more content…
It isn’t underground or a railroad. The reason it was called the Underground Railroad is because it had to be secretive and the people that knew about it used railroad terms as a code. The “railroad” of this system is the method the runaway black slaves took off from their masters and the plantation they worked on, and headed towards the free North. They would take back roads, go through swamps, forests, streams and lakes; avoiding vastly populated areas. The people taking these routes were the “packages” on the railroad. There were numerous different routes because if the same route was used too much, a bounty hunter would eventually find it and capture the runaway…show more content…
n.p., 2012. Web. 17 Dec. 2012. Retrieved from:http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h481.html “Myths of the Underground Railroad.” teacher.scholastic.com. Scholastic Inc. 2012. Web. 17 Dec. 2012. Retrieved from:http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/bhistory/underground_railroad/myths.htm Eric Foner and John A. Garraty. history.com. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 1991. Web. Retrieved from:http://www.history.com/topics/underground-railroad 17 Dec. 2012. Blight, David. Passages to Freedom: The Underground Railroad in History and Memory. New York: Smithsonian Books, 2004. Print. Pybus, Cassandra. Epic Journeys of Freedom: Runaway Slaves and the American Revolution and Their Global Quest for Liberty. United States of America: Beacon Press books, 2006. Print. Blockson, Charles. The Underground Railroad. New York: Prentice Hall Press, 1987.
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