There Will Be Blood Analysis

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Jonny Greenwood’s There Will Be Blood It’s around 8:30pm on a thursday evening, middle of the summer. The cloud’s hang low in the sky threatening this body of people with a warm rain. As the night goes on the rain will pick up slightly but it will never grow heavier than a light drizzle. To a majority of the 2500 people standing in this field all this mean’s is there is no risk of the rain putting out their marijuana cigarettes. The sky grows darker and darker. The moment approaches almost as if with prejudice, minutes creeping by unnaturally slow. Finally, 5 men walk onstage and without speaking a single word they begin their set. Hundreds of thousands of lights illuminate in organized chaos. Every color of the…show more content…
On the right side of the stage crouched low over multiple racks of effects, pedals, guitars, synths and bizarre homemade “instruments” is the ugliest british citizen to ever become a millionaire, Jonny Greenwood. While anyone with an opinion about music would most likely agree that Greenwood is a brilliant noisemaker, his musicianship spans the gap between popular artists and classical composers. Greenwood has done (specifically in the last five years) very extensive composure for film, his band, and also BBC television shows. It is arguable that his work on Paul Anderson’s film There Will Be Blood was the calcification of his creative genius, at least in the minds of western-world film appreciators. Realistically one could say that had the film’s score been composed by someone else, it may not have been nearly as successful. Greenwood in many cases has managed to take the score and make it so incredibly distinguishable that the music itself causes our emotional reactions to the film…show more content…
For some musician’s their story is definitive of the style of music they play. This is usually the case with genre musicians like “rappers” and frequently country musicians. For these two specific groups there is a social connotation associated with the kind of music they played. Many of these types of musicians would probably tell you similar stories about their experiences and their love for their music. In that regard (and in relation to Greenwood) we can begin to understand his creative brilliance by looking at his story. In modern music it is startlingly rare to find that a musician has been classically trained in their instrument of choice let alone trained in multiple instruments. Of course this statement is a bit leading as Greenwood himself is classically trained in multiple instruments. His classical training allows him to compose in the manner he has while his experience playing in an alternative rock band has given him a unique view of the way he writes music. The score for There Will Be Blood was recorded in it’s entirety at Abbey Road Studios in London, the same studio that The Beatles recorded their album “Abbey Road.” Greenwood wrote and recorded the score by himself. Interestingly enough, before Anderson asked Greenwood to work on the
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