Theme Of Nature In Brave New World

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When they are considered together, how do Huxley’s and Scott’s representations sustain interest in humanity’s relationship with nature? Both texts explore ‘In The Wild’ by demonstrating dehumanization within an urban system as a result of scientific advances and a mass corporate culture. Although they were composed almost 50 years apart, Huxley’s Brave New World and Scott’s Blade Runner – Director’s Cut both focus on the deterioration of humanity’s relationship with nature, and deal with the same thematic concerns – reproductive technology, dehumanisation, and the environment. Both texts present a dystopic future and question what it is to be human. In Brave New World, the issue is not the advancement of science as such: it is the advancement…show more content…
Due to the Second Industrial Revolution, Huxley was critical of the idea that the future humanity would live in large impersonal communities in cities and pursue lifestyles, which were potentially separate from the natural environment. The World State controls humanity and nature, and this has led to humanity’s separation from the natural environment. The World Controllers seek to distance society from the natural world and its rhythms, and so nature is marginalised. Young children are conditioned to hate nature through the use of sirens and electric shots, “a love of nature kept no factories busy.” The relationship with nature is not completely severed, “we condition the masses to hate the country…but…to love all country sports that entail the use of elaborate apparatus.” Everything is considered in terms of a benefit to the economy, thus exploiting nature. The Savage Reservation is a primitive natural setting, juxtaposed with the rigidity of the World State. It is a place of squalor, filled with disease-ridden…show more content…
Increased industrial development in the 1970s led to an increase in urbanisation, which Scott believed would severely damage the environment, thus forcing him to present a degraded environment to critique humanity’s exploitative relationship with nature. Endless scenes depict urban decay and the chaos of Asian street life. The opening panning shot with its doomsday imagery depicts Los Angeles as Hades. The neon advertising lights illuminate the sky as opposed to stars, inviting the audience to evaluate the impact of out-of-control capitalism on our planet. The dark and gloomy mean streets emphasise the film noir aspects present in the film, and the slow eerie Vangelis music and constant acid rain is used by Scott to create a melancholy ambience. In contrast, the Tyrell Corporation is depicted as a majestic Mayan inspired pyramid. This dreary and depressing landscape shows audiences the impact of technology and mass consumerism on the environment. Both Brave New World and Blade Runner depict chilling dystopic futures where the materialistic scientific and economic ways of thinking have been allowed to quash the humanistic morals and values, in the name of progress. Through language features and film techniques, stark pitiful visions of a future devoid of nature and humanity are presented to question
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