The Sense of Emancipation from Previous Restriction or Repression Is Fundamental to Literary and Cinematic Representations of the Twentieth-Century City.

2384 Words10 Pages
Q. ‘The sense of emancipation from previous restriction or repression is fundamental to literary and cinematic representations of the twentieth-century city.’ A sense of emancipation from previous restriction or repression is a theme that runs through many of the literary and cinematic representations of the twentieth-century city yet, it is not a theme that is central to them all. Many representations have different or coexisting themes that are just as essential if not more so. To discuss this theory a close analysis of James Joyce’s ‘Eveline’, and New York texts by Claude McKay and Langston Hughes will be conducted by considering the author’s techniques perspectives and literary styles. Dubliners by James Joyce, is a collection of short stories first published in 1914. (Haslam and Hooper, 2012, p13). Joyce arranged these stories in sequence to portray the city of Dublin ‘growing up’, ‘I have tried to present [Dublin] to the indifferent public under four of its aspects: childhood, adolescence, maturity and public life’ (Haslam and Hooper, 2012, p18). Throughout his sequence of stories Joyce used central themes such as religion and psychological paralysis to convey his concerns regarding some of the darker aspects of Dublin society and ‘the narrow morality of its inhabitants’ (Haslam and Hooper, 2012, p19). The story of ‘Eveline’ portrays adolescence in Joyce’s sequence, and tells a tale of a young girls desire to escape the brutality of an abusive father and a restrictive mundane existence by having the chance to leave her home with her lover. Because of her desire to escape, there is a sense of emancipation in this tale however; it is the idea of psychological, leading to eventual physical paralysis that drives the story of ‘Eveline’ rather than the theme of escape from restriction or repression. Joyce uses the character Eveline to portray the

More about The Sense of Emancipation from Previous Restriction or Repression Is Fundamental to Literary and Cinematic Representations of the Twentieth-Century City.

Open Document