The Regan Doctrine

1236 Words5 Pages
The Regan Doctrine: Past and Present This paper is here to examine the doctrine of President Ronald Reagan (1980-1988). Using multiple sources, the paper will show how the doctrine had a profound on the Cold War and the aftermath that would affect America‘s future. The Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan In 1979, The Soviet Union began its invasion of Afghanistan. According to Roskin and Berry (2010), the main reasons the Soviets invaded Afghanistan were: 1. To protect the Pro-Soviet Afghan government from being overthrown by rebels. 2. If the rebels (Mujahedin) were to have won, it would create dissidence in the Soviet Muslim territories. 3. To be in close proximity to the Strait of Horzmus, which was a strategic position of where…show more content…
However, most scholars believe that internal issues of the Soviet Union lead to its downfall, with some nudging from the U.S (Roskin & Berry, 2010, p. 93-94). The United States continued to support the Mujahedin as they continued fighting the Afghani Communist government and was able to oust them in 1992. From then on, U.S. policy shifted, and funding to the Afghanis were cut. The U.S also tried to by back their Stinger missiles, to prevent them from getting into terrorist hands (Synovitz, 2005, para. 5). A power struggle ensued and anarchy reigned. The ISI, with the backing of the U.S. created the Taliban, a fundamentalist Islamic group that was promoted to help stabilize Afghanistan and its borders. By 2001, they would turn on both the ISI and United States (Roskin & Berry, 2010, p. 227). Another figure, Osama bin Laden also began his rise to power. Although he disliked Americans in the Soviet war effort, bin Laden was considered to be an ally to the United States. After the war, he would then orchestrate attacks against the western world, and would be the mastermind of the September 11th attacks in America, which caused the U.S to invade…show more content…
The United States was able to fight communism without having to put U.S forces in action, with support to anti-soviet rebels. In the short term, this proved successful of removing communistic powers and formation of U.S-friendly governments. However, the long term goals of were hampered, as governments that formed usually involved a militaristic regime or total anarchy. It also left many people to resent the United States and later opposed to U.S policies. Especially in Afghanistan, where the U.S cut and ran after the Soviet defeat, not willing to establish some sort of democracy in the country. These resentments eventually lead to the blowback effect, and lead to the rise of Islamic militant groups, such as Al-Qaida, and the beginning of the War on Terror.
Open Document