The Radical Revolution Analysis

954 Words4 Pages
Trent West Dr. Shefsiek History 105 9 March, 2013 Radical Revolution Gordon Wood and Gary Nash would both agree that the American Revolution ignited "radical" changes resulting in the upheaval of known society. These changes would forever alter America and the world for the betterment of all social groups. Wood viewed the revolution as the by product of a driven group of gentry, the founding fathers, who wholeheartedly strove for equal opprotunity for all men. Nash on the otherhand contended that the revolution began with common and oppressed inhabitants of the colonies pushing for righteousness. In Radical Possibilities of the American Revolution Wood sheds light on the monarchical rule and society that spilled over from Britian…show more content…
"... we have not appreciated the lives and labors, the sacrifices and struggles, the glorious messiness, the hopes and fears of divers groups that fought in the longest and most disruptive war in our history with vision of launching a new age filling their heads." (Nash) These individuals included slaves, women, and those in servitude whom held absolutely no power or freedom. To them "radicalism" simply meant enjoying the same freedoms and liberties of all white land owners. Nash explains, once again, how these original "radical" ideals became applied to an unintended group. "The language of protest against England reminded many American women that they too were badly treated 'subjects' - the subject of husbands who often dealt with them cruelly and exercised power over them arbitrarily." (Nash) The correspondence of Abigail Adams and John Adams accurately depict the oppression women faced. Abigail presents intellectually strong arguments pleading for women rights while John ignorantly dismisses the…show more content…
The social changes brought about were unforseen and unimaginable in the current time. Nash credits the Revolution with beginning a movement that would ultimately abolish slavery, grant citizenship to the free, strengthen womens rights, honor Native American land and political rights, and begin public education. Wood sums up the Revolution with "The familial image of government now lost all its previous relevance, and the state in America emerged as something very different from what it had been." (Wood) Coupled with the downfall of the monarchical society the way was paved for women, slaves, and servants to acheive their dreams of equality. That they would one day stand face to face with white males and share a mutual
Open Document