The Poisonwood Bible Summary

1451 Words6 Pages
The Poisonwood Bible I. Authorial Background Barbara Kingsolver April 8, 1955 Kentucky Other works include The Bean Trees (1988), Animal Dreams (1990), and Pigs in Heaven (1993) II. Setting Congo villages Early 1960s through the mid 1990s Although European culture had influenced part of African society, villages in the heart of central Africa still retained their tribal values and were led by a chief. Their homes were made of mud and sticks, and they cooked over open flame in whatever they could find to use as a pot. Many adults wore little clothing and many children went completely naked. Women carried baskets and other objects on their heads and had little to no hair. Children suffered malnutrition and,…show more content…
Plot Summary The Price family goes to Kilanga as missionaries in 1959. Although the girls made friends with the villagers, Nathan had little success with conversion and baptism. Conflict between the Belgians and revolutionaries grew and resulted in the establishment of the Republic of the Congo. Ruth May and Orleanna became ill and tension within the Price family worsened. The money the Price family had lived on stopped coming, yet Nathan insisted on staying in the Congo. The villagers voted against Christianity and the battles between the family became even worse. Ruth May was bitten by a green mamba and died. The Price women left Nathan in Kilanga. Adah and Orleanna returned to America, Rachel went to South Africa, and Leah married Anatole and stayed in the Congo. The new leader of the Congo hoarded money to glorify himself, rather than allow the citizens to lead healthy lives. The Price family grew apart and eventually they learned to move on from their emotional attachment to the…show more content…
Literary Devices Foreshadowing Foreshadowing occurs when something in a work hints at a later plot development. “She tears through her life like she plans on living out the whole thing before she hits twenty.” page 145 “And while Our Father was preaching the gospel of poisonwood, his own daughter Ruth May rose from the dead. Our father did not particularly notice.” page 276 “The death of something living is the price of our survival and we pay it again and again.” page
Open Document