The Ownership and structure of the television industry in the UK. Essay

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The Ownership and structure of the television industry in the UK. Terrestrial television, it’s a form of broadcasting which doesn’t revolve around using communication satellites to send them to the TV, it uses grounded cables so broadcast the channels. Common as it is in Europe it is seemingly uncommon in places like America, which the majority revolve around satellite. It was the first method of television delivery; another method didn’t come into view until 1950’s The programmes that are broadcasting with terrestrial methods are BBC One, Two, ITV, Channel 4, and Five. In the channels there are two different types of sub broadcasting. There is Commercial TV, which is when they get money from ads and also consists of sponsorships such as Harvey’s Furniture Store sponsors Coronation Street. The channels in the terrestrial that broadcast in this way are ITV, Channel 4, and Five. With commercial broadcasting, in an hour of broadcast time on a commercial broadcast outlet, typically ten to twenty minutes are devoted to advertising BBC One & Two do public service broadcasting where they rely on the public to watch their channel and get the money from the license fees. People are paying a certain amount of money as a TV license fee for what they’re watching and thus the BBC gets a percentage of that so that they can keep broadcasting. John Reith in general founded BBC; it was launched in 1932 on television, and has now become the world’s largest broadcasting corporation. There are also companies in the TV business that own certain channels, such as ITV and Channel 5 are owned mainly by Granada and Carlton, however Rupert Murdoc, the man who started Sky Television and has also invested in the Films Media and the internet, owns 17%. However a new method that has come into play since the 1960’s is Satellite TV. Both of them have subscriptions monthly,

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