The Name of War: King Phillips War Book Review

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The Name of War: King Phillip’s War and the Origins of American Identity The causes and conflicts regarding war are deeply complex and these complexities make examining the history of war all the more difficult. To the victor goes the spoils, and in war not only the tangible rewards of triumph. Written history is predominantly told through the words of the victorious. Here in lies the problem of writing objective historical analyses. Likewise, such is the case with King Phillip’s war in seventeenth century colonial America. Thus Jill Lepore’s book, The Name of War: King Phillip’s War and the Origins of American Identity, is a tremendous undertaking. However, Lepore steps out of the box and examines this historical event from a unique and interesting perspective. In 1999 when Lepore wrote The Name of War, she was an assistant professor of History at Boston University. Since then she moved on to Harvard University and became the Chair of the History and Literature program in 2003 and was “named Harvard College Professor in 2012.” Lepore received her undergraduate degree in English, her masters in American Culture and her Ph.D. in American Studies she is also a contributing writer to the New Yorker Magazine. Jill Lepore’s education and qualifications are deeply rooted in literature and has received many awards for her works. Specifically for the book The Name of War, Lepore received the Bancroft Prize, the Berkshire Prize and the Ralph Waldo Emerson Award. Lepore’s literary background leads her to present a different historiographical angle in regards to this bloody episode from America’s past. The book, The Name of War: King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity, is structured into four parts containing two chapters each, the book also contains an introduction, a brief chronological timeline, a prologue and an epilogue. Part one is

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