The Lakota Sioux Tradition

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Lakota Tradition Tradition; the handing down of statements, beliefs, legends, customs, and information, from generation to generation, especially by word of mouth or by practice (Tradition). Tradition is an important aspect of many cultures, including the Lakota Sioux Indian tribe. Everyone learns through time what to believe in, the roles they should play in their families and communities, the jobs they should be doing, and the religion they should be practicing. No matter the gender, age, ethnicity, or rank, everyone practices tradition. In the Sioux nation, some traditions are formed by the location they reside in and the events they have gone through. Some events can influence a change in traditions. In this paper I…show more content…
The adopted language is a Siouan language that is mutually understandable with the Dakota Sioux and Nakota Sioux language and it is considered the most linguistic of the three divisions (Lakota language). It represents one of the largest Native American language speech communities. The language was first used in a written form by Presbyterian missionaries around 1840 (Lakota Language). They developed the standard alphabet which allowed nearly all Lakota men to read and compose in their own language. Then the Lakota people transformed the written language to a spoken language (Lakota Language). The language has the ability to express thoughts or ideas uniquely. A change of syllables used at the end of words occurs between different genders (Lakota Language). The Lakota Sioux also used their own form of sign language to communicate. The Indian sign language was indecipherable to the Euro-Americans and other native tribes. The mothers passed down the language and educated their children to speak it (Lakota…show more content…
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