The Importance Of Title Vii In The Workplace

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Title VII, which was adopted and passed within the Civil Rights Act of 1964 has forever changed the make up of today’s workforce. Prior to the inception of Title VII, employees had few, if any, protections against discriminatory practices. Title VII provided certain provisions to ensure that American employees are treated fairly and not discriminated against. This paper will discuss the scope of Title VII, its amendments, and applications in the workplace. The following areas are addressed: the prerequisites for protection, the EEOC and its role, the ADA, ADEA, PDA amendments and sexual harassment. Title VII provided a means to create a diverse and fair environment for employees, and has been successful in the effort. Remarkable strides…show more content…
The bill was met with extreme opposition from lawmakers, lobbyists, and citizens. As the bill passed through the Senate and House it was amended several times. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed and became a significant part of history. “The Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination in voting, education, employment, public accommodations, and the receipt of federal funds on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, or religion” (Bennett-Alexander & Hartman, 2007, p. 70). Title VII of The Civil Rights Act covers employment protections. After the passing of Title VII, it has been amended several times to strengthen it and cover more individuals (Bennett-Alexander & Hartman, 2007). The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) passed by Congress in 1967 to protect workers over the age of 40 from discrimination. In 1978, Congress passed the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), which protects pregnant women from discrimination in the workplace. Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990 to protect qualified individuals with a disability from…show more content…
“Title VII prohibits the employer from using a facially neutral employment practice that has an unjustified adverse impact on members of a protected class” (HR Guide to the Internet, n.d.). Disparate treatment discrimination makes sure no direct discrimination occurs to people apart of a protected class. “Disparate Treatment Title VII prohibits employers from treating applicants or employees differently because of their membership in a protected class” (HR Guide to the Internet). Companies are normally very sensitive not to discriminate against employees knowingly or unknowingly. Recently in New Haven Connecticut 77 fire fighters of various ethnic backgrounds: Caucasians, African Americans and Hispanics took a promotion test to become eligible for the position of captain. After taking the test 41 Caucasians passed, nine African American’s passed and six Hispanics passed. However, of the 56 who passed only 19 were eligible for immediate promotion. The people eligible were 17 white and two Hispanics. Because no African American’s were immediately eligible to promote, the city of New Haven threw out all the tests to avoid a lawsuit for disparate impact discrimination. Eventually, the case was taken to the Supreme Court overturned the ruling allowing all individuals immediately eligible for promotion to be promoted. The above case
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