The Great Depression: Policy Impact

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The Great Depression: Policy Impact By Team A University of Phoenix ECO/212 The Great Depression: Policy Impact Thesis: The Great Depression resulted in many policy changes in the United States. These policy changes affected the United States as well as the world. The government responded in a proactive manner which resulted in system alterations. A continual evolution of these policies, laws and acts has shown a constant economic growth and change. Additionally, these policies have shown the difference in need depending on the circumstances of the time. The Great Depression: Policy Impact The Great depression did not only affect the United States, but the world as well. By the early 1930s unemployment had reached six…show more content…
The purpose of the New Deal was to provide relief to the unemployed and those in danger of losing farms and homes, recovery to agriculture and business, and reform notably through the inception of the vast Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The Social Security Act (SSA) was created to provide relief. The SSA is a system of old-age benefits for workers, benefits for victims of industrial accidents, unemployment insurance, aid for dependent mothers and children, the blind, and the physically handicapped (Social Security Act (1935)) The Tennessee Valley Authority, a corporation owned by the U.S. government, provides electricity for 9 million people in parts of seven southeastern states at prices below the national average. TVA, which receives no taxpayer money and makes no profits, also provides flood control, navigation and land management for the Tennessee River system and assists utilities and state and local governments with economic development. (About…show more content…
The rise of labor organizations resulted from the growth of industry in the 1920s and the devastating effects of the Great Depression in the 1930s (Labor Unions Rise, 2011). Unions had been present since the 1800 but they were not officially acknowledged by the government. The first organized union was the United Automobile Workers of America in 1935 by the automobile workers. Unemployment was high and employers took advantage of the employees during desperate like times of the Great Depression. Workers were paid low wages, were forced to perform in unsafe working conditions, and lack of job security caused the workers to form unions. Workers began an effective sit-down strike at factories which prevented the employers from hiring other people to replace the workers. The women organized a first aid station, child care, and collected money and food to aid the strikers and their families. Laborers united across the country and organized strikes against other business. In 1935, Congress passed the National Labor Relations Act (hereinafter referred to as
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