The Effects Of Classical Music

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While audience demographics show that classical music appeals to the highly educated and the elderly, it is commonly acknowledged that classical music is not taken up by younger generations. This lack of interest amongst people in their teens to college graduate cohorts potentially threatens the existence of classical music practice today and the near future. Before discussing the negative relation of young people to classical music, the rest of this chapter will pay attention to the relative factors which are influential in the alleged decline of classical music. Looking at classical music in statistics, The Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) has published figures showing that while 13% of the population in the United States…show more content…
Up to the year 1982, audiences aged between twenty-four and twenty-nine occupied 24% of overall demographics whereas this value fell to 12.9% a decade later (Kolb, “The Effect” 18). Kolb argues that the decline of concert-going among individuals in their twenties is due to their changing musical tastes and values that are influenced by the generation they grew up in (“The Effect” 20). Generational trends in society mirrors particular ways a population reacts to the cultural environment they are based in. These trends reflect the values of the individuals; a moral principle formed early on in life, of one's self concept and one's image ascribed by others (Kolb, Marketing 55). These values are not only influenced by personal traits but also by societal conditions, which, as a result, has the power to affect people's musical…show more content…
At this point, it is useful to bring the perspective of the funding situation into the debate. Funding is a vital aspect of orchestra tradition, which in the US is largely supported by private patronage. Since orchestras belong to the non-profit sector, the funding is also dependent on public incentives (Voss et al. 2). The importance of this patronage can be illustrated by the fact that nearly half – sometimes even more – of the income of organizations and orchestras is made up of contributions (Ziff 307). According to the first longitudinal financial report made by the League of American Orchestras, the largest expenses, surpassing the concert production fees, are the payments for musicians, conductors and artists' education, which accounts for 46% of the average budget (Voss et al. 5). In addition, The League for American Orchestras observes that 43% of the overall income of orchestras is made up of contributed income, and the government funding only accounts for 7% of it (Voss et al. 12). Classical music may be seen to fail serving the interests, trends and desires of contemporary society despite its vast economic contribution of $1.8 billion in 2014 (Voss et al. 1). Noting the limited financial incentives, one must consider the decisions, that are made by the government in providing only minimum
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