The Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1963

1843 Words8 Pages
The Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1963 [Click Here for Printable Version of this section] May 1954 Supreme Court decides Brown v. Board (David Halberstam, The Fifties, Chapter 28) [pic][pic] The Supreme Court, under Chief Justice Earl Warren, announced its decision in the case of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas on May 17, 1954. The decision declared that the system of segregated public schools in the United States was unconstitutional. A unanimous Court ruled that "separate" was inherently unequal. The majority opinion cited sociological evidence to argue that the separation itself --- regardless of whether facilities were equal --- cultivated a sense of inferiority in black children. In handing down this ruling, the…show more content…
On December 1, 1955, she boarded a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. During her ride, she was told to move out of her seat and to the "colored section" in the back. She refused and was arrested. Her arrest triggered a systematic response among the civil rights community in Montgomery --- a boycott of public transportation. Leading the boycott effort was a young Reverend Martin Luther King, pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. The boycott lasted over a year and ended on November 13, 1956 when the U.S. Supreme court ruled that the Montgomery segregation law was…show more content…
The place was Jackson, Mississippi. The field secretary for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Medgar Evers, was leading a protest against Jackson's system of segregation. That evening, Evers arrived home, stepped out of his car, and was shot in the back. He died on his driveway with his wife and children looking on. [pic] [pic] [pic] [pic] Medgar Evers Byron De La Beckwith (1963 & 1994) Bobby DeLaughter The assassin was white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the Ku Klux Klan and a man with an intimidating and violent personality. Beckwith was arrested, tried, and acquitted by an all white jury. Years later, in 1994, Assistant District Attorney, Bobby DeLaughter, reopened the case. This led to a retrial in which the jury convicted Beckwith, 31 years after the act, of assassinating Medgar Evers. The story of Beckwith's second trial is the subject of the 1996 film entitled Ghosts of Mississippi. August 28, 1963 The March on
Open Document