The Black Panthers: Social Movement

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The Black Panthers Social movements are usually unofficial or unsanctioned joint efforts of individuals or citizens aiming to bring a difference in their world. Countries and indeed the whole world is somehow better off today because social movements have shaped our culture, politics, economies, and many other sectors which are critical for development. National and world history has been crucially shaped through the efforts of social movements. This paper critically reviews the literature on the Black Panthers social movement formed in October 1966 in the United States of America by Bobbie Seale and Huey Newton who were both activists at Merritt Junior College in Oakland California (Ogba, 77). The party was inspired and mainly influenced…show more content…
It is this Committee that spoke on behalf of the movement as they were elites and needed to enlighten the community of the oppression they are undergoing. The Black Panthers movement was embraced by most of the people who felt oppressed such as the Blacks and the Puerto Rican young men and even the white revolutions which were against racial discrimination and in need to reform the American society. However, the movement was strongly resisted by the government and its agencies such as the police and the FBI who brutally abused the Panthers and mercilessly killed them (Reed, 57). The Police brutality was extreme that, the whole group was to be completely wiped out. The FBI achieved their goal by infiltrating the Movement through informants and using propaganda as a tool to cause division among the group’s leadership (Armstrong,…show more content…
In addition the, the movement was not intimidated by police guns or the FBI but put up a strong fight on behalf of the people. However the group did not anticipate informants to be within it (Lazerow, 80). The Formal Nature of the Black Panthers Newton and Seale chose a military form of organization with a clear chain of command and an established hierarchy with a central committee made up of various ministers (Reed, 57). They were driven by the feeling they held black people on the streets and therefore needed discipline. This structure emphasized on military training in arm and official marching. The leaders believed that in order to achieve radical change enlightened elites needed to push for it (Lazerow, 28). During its formation the party was intended for the local people but it later established alliances with other groups and acquired an international outfit. The group formed alliances with revolution groups in Cuba, Middle East, South East Asia and Africa. Within America it affiliated with groups such as; The Puerto Rican young lords, The American Indian movement among others (Reed,
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