The Asean Regional Forum And Security Governance I Essay

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“The ASEAN Regional Forum and Security Governance in Asia-Pacific” Katja Weber Georgia Institute of Technology katja.weber@inta.gatech.edu ABSTRACT This paper sketches security provisions in Asia-Pacific following World War II and takes a look at ASEAN to set the stage for a closer examination of the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF). Having discussed the rationale for the creation of the ARF, its institutional framework, fundamental principles, and decision-making, the paper then examines the organization’s main developments with respect to four security functions (prevention, assurance, protection and compellence) developed by Kirchner and Sperling (2007), and assesses the ARF’s effectiveness and future prospects. Prepared for Presentation at the EUSA Eleventh Biennial International Conference, Marina del Rey, CA, April 23-25, 2009. Comments are welcome, but please do not cite without permission. 1 “The ASEAN Regional Forum and Security Governance in Asia-Pacific” In the aftermath of WWII, and once again at the end of the Cold War, Europeans created order and thereby assured their stability. As previously shown (Weber and Huang 2008), they did so by transcending historical legacies, but also by including former enemies into security structures, tying the US to the European continent and thus, over time, promoting principles, norms and rules that built trust and redefined identities. Or, put differently, Europeans promoted peace and stability by giving rise to what Webber et. al. (2004), Kirchner (2006), and Kirchner and Sperling (2007) characterize as “security governance.” Security provisions in the Asia-Pacific region look very different. History there is still divisive, and a “hub and spokes network” consisting of five bilateral alliances (between the US and Australia, Japan, South Korea, the Philippines and Thailand), along with the Association of

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