The Acute Stress Response

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Acute Stress Response Cheryl Welch Liberty University Abstract The purpose of this paper is to define and explain the acute stress response and acute stress disorder. Clarify the differences between the two conditions and offer review of treatments and symptoms associated with both. Therapies and interventions are reviewed and explored for effectiveness in resolving symptoms and preventing post-traumatic stress disorder. The acute stress response (ASR) refers to psychological and physiological responses to stressful events. These responses are displayed by emotional, cognitive, and behavioral changes. Somatic symptoms and symptoms of mental illness can also be seen in ASR especially when the reaction is severe. ASR manifests itself after the occurrence of a traumatic event and its symptoms can be unstable and complicated. The severity of ASR symptoms can lessen as time passes, but not for everyone. How a person recovers from the initial stress response depends on many factors. The emotional and physical health of the individual, past traumatic experiences, level of perceived threat, and the severity of the event. Age plays a role as well, with children responding and presenting differently from adults due to developmental processes. Adults are better able to verbalize their experiences and feeling where as children are unable to do so putting them at higher risk for a long term stress disorder. It is crucial to provide early intervention to help people cope with the emotional, physical, cognitive, and psychological effects of the acute stress response. Acute Stress Response The acute stress response (ASR) refers to psychological and physiological responses to stressful events. (Yang, et al., 2011) These responses are displayed by emotional, cognitive, and behavioral changes. (Yang, et al., 2011) Somatic symptoms and symptoms of mental illness can also be
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