Tentative Language Essay

312 WordsAug 9, 20122 Pages
Running head: USING TENTATIVE LANGUAGE Using Tentative Language Marlene Seward Everest University August 4, 2012 Using Tentative Language Using Tentative Language From reading Chapter 3, “Perception and Communication” and the Learning Activities links, in order to have competent interpersonal communications depends on us being able to distinguish inferences from facts. An inference involves interpretation that goes beyond the facts and a fact is an objective statement that is based on observation (Wood, 2013). Some people might confuse inferences from facts and treat inferences as if they were factual. I might think the following statement is factual; therefore perceive it to be factual. “My clients are hyperactive.” There could be several reasons why my clients are hyperactive. One reason could be they have attention deficit disorder or they can have a thyroid condition (What are the Causes of Hyperactivity, 2012). In order not to make inferences, I should have added the word seems to my statement. There would be instances where I would find tentative language to be more accurate. When someone says “he is,” or “she is,” or “they are,” they are making a factual statement and also making inferences. “He is always turning his homework in late,” “He lacks motivation.” Saying “He is always turning his homework in late,” is a fact; but saying “He lacks motivation,” is an inference, since we do not know why he is not motivated. In conclusion, an inference involves interpretation that goes beyond the fact and a fact is an objective statement that is based on observation. A person can make a factual statement and make an inference by saying “She is,” or “They are,” or “He is.” Using Tentative language References What are the Causes of Hyperactivity? (2012). Retrieved August 1,

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