Sympathy For Scrooge Analysis

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Sympathy for Scrooge Dickens creates very little sympathy for Scrooge during the first stave. Scrooge is seen as the pantomime villain for whom no one can feel sorry. However, during the reclamation the reader begins to feel more sympathy as Scrooge regains his ability to feel emotion. In the first Stave, all of Scrooge’s problems are self-inflicted. He is seen as a very cruel person who cannot be saved from himself. He only allows Bob Cratchit one lump of coal and tells him to ‘be in early’ the next day. We only begin to feel sympathy for him once Marley appears. Although this is comic, it is also quite sad for Scrooge as he is basically shown his future. The reader feels sympathy as being shown what your life holds is painful,…show more content…
We feel sorry for him as he is alone while all other children play together outside. He is then abandoned at school by his family until his sister comes to ‘rescue’ him. We feel sympathy as this abandonment is not his fault and we therefore feel pity. We also feel sorry for him as he begins to feel bad about rejecting his rescuer’s son at Christmas. At his family home, we realise that his only friends were characters in books, showing he had a very lonely upbringing. This makes the reader feel sympathy as he regains his imagination and ability to feel emotion. However, when we meet his fiancé, we lose our sympathy as he had a chance to be happy, and missed it due to his obsession with wealth and possessions. Although, by the end of the Stave, we again feel sympathy as he begs to go home as he cannot handle the…show more content…
Although he doesn’t know it, we see his only friends at the stock market saying they would only go to Scrooge’s funeral ‘for the buffet.’ This shows that he is totally alone in the world and we therefore feel sorry for him. At the Beetling shop, people haggle over his possessions. This shows us that everything he worked and lived for does him no good in after life and cannot buy him mourners to keep the rats from ‘gnawing at the wall.’ We also feels sympathy as his debtors are happy to see him dead as they no longer have to pay him. If Scrooge understood, this would pain him and make him feel very alone with no one who cares for him. We, the reader, feel a lot of sympathy when he visits the Cratchit’s as he sees that Tiny Tim has died. Scrooge feels bad as he is indirectly responsible due to him giving Bob such low wages and not helping the family. The reader also feels sympathy as Scrooge witnesses Want and Ignorance and is made to feel as though in his microcosm he is partially responsible for these
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