Swot Analysis Of Beach Collaroy

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Year 10 Geography Assessment Task By Adam Gergich A Spatial Perspective This geographical issues being focussed on are the coastal processes taking place on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, mainly on the 3 km stretch of beach from Dee Why to Narrabeen, as well as the management of these processes. These beaches are slowly deteriorating, and without the right treatment for these problems, we could lose the beaches all together. These issues spans across a number of beaches, including Dee Why, Long Reef, Collaroy, and the southern part of Narrabeen. Storm damage and coastal erosion has been a severe problem for decades all along this stretch of land, especially on Collaroy Beach. This is usually caused by natural process operating along the…show more content…
Nationally, Collaroy is the 3rd area most at risk of coastal processes. It is also the most highly capitalised beachfront in NSW. These topics are often debated by council and community members. The development of Collaroy is much different to that of Dee Why. While the main roads and shopping centres are relatively out of the way in Dee Why, that is not the case for Collaroy. Pittwater Rd runs parallel to the beach for over a kilometre, merely 120 metres from the shoreline. This leaves very little room on the eastern side of the road for construction. Yet buildings have still been erected with permission from Warringah Council, and this is where the real problem stems from; the fact that the initial sub-division was too close to the beach with properties extending into the active beach zone. The Flight Deck building, Collaroy In addition to the houses being unsafe to live in, they are also damaging the beach itself. After large storms over the years, the huge tides and waves have reached the houses.…show more content…
And although they offer financial and technical support, there are still problems on the Northern Beaches coastline. The erosion on Collaroy Beach is one of the worst cases in NSW, and without efficient action the problem will only get worse. In 2002 the Warringah council proposed to build a seawall on the beach. This was met with much criticism from the community, mainly due to the fact that a seawall would destroy the beaches natural beauty, something that no one wants to see. The designs for the sea wall cost roughly $100,000, and to build the wall would cost upwards of $11,000,000, of which 40% would be paid by the homeowners of Collaroy. Another idea proposed by the council was to have minor sand nourishment carried out on Collaroy beach. Using only local sand from nearby construction sites, this process only cost $100,000; however it is only a temporary solution and has to be done every year. This strategy was used in mid 2010 with success. Another form of this is ‘moderate sand nourishment’. This has sand taken from the ocean bed 30-60 metres deep. It can cost up to
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