Summary: The Australian Parliamentary System

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Chapter 1 – The Australian Parliamentary System Key Knowledge: The key knowledge covered in this chapter includes:  The principles of the Australian Parliamentary system: Representative Government, Responsible Government and the Separation of Powers. Key Skills: You should demonstrate your ability to:  Define key legal terminology and use it appropriately.  Discuss, interpret and analyse legal information and data.  Explain the principles and structures of the Australian Parliamentary system. Key legal Terminology: Bicameral: Means ‘two houses of parliament’. All parliaments in Australia except that of Queensland and the territories have two houses. Cabinet: Cabinet consists of the prime minister and…show more content…
If the government loses support of the lower house then it must resign. Royal Assent: Royal assent is the signing of a proposed law by the Crown’s representative before it becomes a law. Separation of powers: The principle of separation of powers refers to the fact that there are three separate types of powers in our parliamentary system. These are legislative power, executive power and judicial power. Judicial power is separate from legislative power and executive power. Statute: Also known as an Act of parliament, this is another term for legislation. Supremacy of Parliament: Also referred to as sovereignty of parliament. This refers to the concept that the final law-making power rests with parliament. Parliament can repeal and amend its own previous legislation and can pass legislation to override common law. Westminster System: The set of principles that underpin our parliamentary system, inherited from the United Kingdom, known as the Westminster system. These are the principles of…show more content…
 Six state parliaments.  Two territory parliaments. The members of parliament are elected by the people and must therefore represent the needs of the people if they wish to keep their seat in parliament. The elected members of parliament are also responsible to the parliament and the people for their actions. The Australian parliamentary system is based of the British Westminster system, which was adopted in the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 (UK), known as the Commonwealth Constitution. The Commonwealth Constitution established the Commonwealth Parliament and outlined its law- making powers. The Bicameral System The Commonwealth and state parliaments operate on a bicameral system, which means two houses: an upper and lower house. Queensland and the territories are exceptions to this rule and only have one house each. At federal level the upper house is the Senate and the lower house is the By Jack Morris House of Representatives. In Victoria the upper house is the Legislative Council and the lower house is the Legislative Assembly. The House of
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