Summary Of First Available Cell

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First Available Cell shed light on the desegregation process that occurred in the Texas prison system in the late 1970’s. Before reading the book, I did not have much knowledge on the severity of the process of segregation, especially how it related to the prison system. However, once I completed the book, I grasped how relentless a belief system can be on transition and improvement. I was especially surprised at the difficulty to overcome the design of racial segregation. With both the inmates and staff resisting change, the action of desegregation within the Texas Department of Corrections (TDC) seemed almost impossible. However, with the constant pressure from the Department of Justice (DOJ), TDC finally was able to implement a plan…show more content…
First Available Cell highlights the controversy and the long tedious road from the emancipation of slaves to the judgments of the many court cases, such as Cooper v. Pate and Lamar v. Coffield that marked the evolution of the Texas Department of Justice’s inevitable…show more content…
p.29) After reading First Available Cell, I was disgusted at the fact that people could actually cause that type of harm upon others for no other reason than for the color of their skin, but also that is was used as a family tradition to pass down to future generations. It is difficult to understand that the mindset of this era- to intimidate, maim, and kill African Americans was the norm, illustrated in the image on page 162 which depicts a young white boy smiling at the burning and lynching of Jesse Washington. This intimidation and brutality with the lack of any rightful prosecution continued for several generations until the 1950’s when, the color line began collapsing and many minorities began to find their voice and to challenge the norm. African Americans began to demand justice and finally gained the support from the government through President Truman. The Civil Rights movement was on the rise. Change was slow, but through victories such as the landmark case Brown v Board of Education, a revolution had begun. This case was, in my opinion, a stepping-stone for ultimate desegregation in our society. It may have started with the educational institutions, but as time went on, it was apparent that many began to wonder, “If we can
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