Summary: America Goes Dry

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Emmy Nidemar Sundsgymnasiet 2014-05-28 America Goes Dry - A study of the prohibition era in the United States of America during the 1920’s. Maria Persson English 7 Table of contents 1. Introduction 1.1 Aim 1.2 Definition 1.3 Problem 1.4 Methods and materials 2. Body 2.1 Why National Prohibition? 2.2 18th Amendment of the Constitution 2.3 Consequences of the Prohibition Enforcement 2.4 Repeal of the 18th…show more content…
However, as time went on, more and more citizens grew sick of not having alcohol, and tried to work their way around the liquor ban. Luckily for them, the Volstead Act contained some loopholes, which the public immediately took advantage of. Throughout Prohibition, some distilleries were still allowed to produce "medicinal whiskey". Bootleggers (alcohol smugglers) quickly discovered that running a pharmacy was the perfect front for their actual trade. Due to this, the number of pharmacists in the state of New York more than tripled during the Prohibition era. For people unable to get a hold of medicinal whiskey and such, there were illegal ways to drink during Prohibition. Organized crime began to flourish in large cities where crime bosses, such as Al Capone, had noticed the incredibly high demand for alcohol and the extremely limited access for the average citizen. This presented lucrative opportunities for gangsters to take over the import, manufacture, and distribution of liquor. Al Capone, and many other criminal groups during this time, were able to build their criminal empires mainly on profits from illegal…show more content…
Instead of an estimated decrease in violence, crime and alcohol consumption, it led to an increase in at least violence and crime. When people could not gain access to alcohol the way they were used to, they had to find an alternate source. This led to a huge black market for alcohol and the start for one of America's most infamous gangsters: Al Capone. The alcohol supplied was however no longer produced under legitimate supervision, and had often been spiked with poison and chemicals, which led to an increase in deaths from alcoholic poisoning. The huge black market for alcohol controlled by crime organizations grew so large that many of the criminal groups were able to build their empires mainly on profits from illegal alcohol. This in turn made them grow in power and their influence on society increased. Many politicians and law enforcements became corrupt, and turned a blind eye to the illegal activity since they were bribed. Prohibition also led to economic consequences. Before the liquor ban, many states relied on tax revenues, and when Prohibition went into effect, those revenues were lost- causing the United Nations to lose 11 billion
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