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******* W***** Professor Eng 112 September 11, 2012 Summary of, “ The Establishment of Genetically Engineered Canola Populations in the U.S.” by Meredith G. Schafer, Andrew A. Ross, Jason P. Londo, Connie A. Burdick, E. Henry Lee, Steven E. Travers, Peter K. Van de Water, and Cynthia L. Sagers In the article, “The Establishment of Genetically Engineered Canola Populations in the U.S.” by Meredith G. Schafer, Andrew A. Ross, Jason P. Londo, Connie A. Burdick, E. Henry Lee, Steven E. Travers, Peter K. Van de Water, and Cynthia L. Sagers determine the effects of genetically engineered canola in North Dakota by performing field studies. The studies vary and mostly check for the DNA composition of canola in the wild with different test strips to test partial genetic make-up in the canola plants. The reason for the field study is to determine if the genetically engineered canola was harming the non-engineered canola already in the area. The field studies, conducted in the months of June and July of 2011, consisted of different roadside audits that would help determine the differences between the wild growing and the genetically engineered canola plants. Leaf fragments were taken from randomly selected plants all along the test sampling area, a total of about 695 miles. These fragments would be tested for the presence of specific proteins that are from herbicides, or weed killers. If a plant has traces of any one of the proteins, it would then be labeled as genetically engineered or transgenic. The results show that the canola plant was in about half of the sampling site for the study, and about 80% was genetically altered. The conclusion was most of the shared genetic traits come from the natural pollination of the plant. Transgenic canola was found in much abundance along heavy traffic highways and in or around construction sites. Wild, non-engineered canola

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