Stewart Huffey: What Is Hypnosis?

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Page 2 Stewart Huffey Upon asking a group of people be it friends, family or people of the street the question what is hypnosis? Will lead to an array of different answers. The history of hypnosis itself stems back over many years the origins of which can go back as far as Egyptian times. A painting showing a person asleep with others standing over them making suggestive movements leads historians to think that some forms of induced trance state was at work. Although the interpretation of wall paintings is difficult to conclude accurate evidence from. It is long thought within the profession that the Grandfather of hypnosis is a man called Franz Anton Mesmer. He was born on 23 May 1734 in Iznang, a small village near Radolfzell in Swabia…show more content…
It is this electrical activity within the brain known as brain waves that given the development within science can be monitored and measured. Enabling us to look more closely at the hypnotic state of mind. The method involved is called electroencephalography and is used in the assessment of brain damage and other conditions. There are four main types of brain wave, varying in frequency, the fastest being beta waves and the slowest being delta waves. Beta waves (15 to 40 cycles per second) these are characteristic of an engaged and focussed mind. A person engaging in active conversation would be in beta rhythm. Alpha waves (9 to 14 cycles per second) these are slower and would be represented by a person taking a rest on completion of any given task. Theta waves (4 to 8 cycles per second) these waves are associated with medium to deep hypnosis and are present during dreaming. Delta waves (1 to 4 cycles per second) whilst in our slowest deepest state of rest these are produced in our…show more content…
By the use of a prepared PMR the therapist using a certain tone to their voice and a delivery of speech that is slow and reassuring, the patient will start to feel very relaxed to eventually falling into a state of hypnosis or hypnotic trance. The way in which a PMR works is making the patient more aware of their bodily functions for example their breathing. With the use of the correct technique the patient will experience more laboured and controlled breathing. They may also become aware of a slower heart rate. At the point of delivery the therapist will ask the patient to find a position that they feel comfortable in, this could be seated or lying down. The therapist may ask at this point for the patient to close their eyes and take a deep breath in and out. Then progressing onto the relaxing of the patients muscles. This may start by asking the patient whilst eyes shut and concentrating on their breathing to visit the top of their head feeling the skin on their forehead relaxing and their jaw muscles dropping. By using this technique the therapist will continue down the body expressing to the patient how relaxed they are feeling all the way to the tips of their toes. Once in an obvious state of relaxation where the shoulders and arms have
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