Sterilization Of Eugenics

2580 Words11 Pages
Evolution Essay The Misuse of Sterilization and Eugenics Perfection is a relative word. Humans most certainly lack perfection no matter how hard they strive for it continuously. Imperfections to a human can consist of physical, emotional, or mental. There is a common cliché that reads 'our imperfections are what make us human'. What if we could rid our human species of these imperfect traits? What if every new human offspring was guaranteed to be strong, healthy, and intelligent? The world would be rid of struggles like heritable diseases and genetic mental retardation. The human race could always produce perfect offspring. There would be no dysgenics or deleterious genes to deteriorate our gene pool as the population grew.…show more content…
In 1927, The supreme court even ruled in favor to sterilize a young woman because she was deemed an 'imbecile' and was involved in promiscuous actions in the case Buck vs Bell (Lombardo, 1996). It is obvious to any educated person today that these traits are certainly not solely heritable. The genetic and evolutionary theory was being misused in these cases. Current genetics expresses the flaws in the way these eugenic programs thought. Most of the 'undesirable' traits were not heritable, they came from environmental conditioning. Even if they were heritable traits, sterilizing these people would not purge the defective genes from our gene pool. The reason for this is because there is a spontaneous pattern of mutations in our genetic make up. Mutations can be caused by numerous environmental factors also and not just from the existing gene pool (Crow, 200). To support this misuse of evolutionary theory, this paper will argue against eugenic programs and sterilization by proving that behavior is not solely heritable, how gene pool size discredits an ideal gene pool, and how deleterious mutations can occur to even the most genetically fit people. Evolutionary…show more content…
Perfection appears to be only in the eye of the beholder. Hitler's idea of perfection was to sterilize and euthanize in order to have a selectively perfect gene pool. Many others would not have the same idea of perfection. He was trying to create the perfect human race. Little did he know that he was set up for failure from the beginning. Respectively, the world supported eugenics at this point in time. The world can still learn from eugenics. Since the 1900s we have realized that a world where there are no deleterious mutations, no diseases, and where everyone is genetically fit is impossible. Life on this planet needs variance in their gene pools to be successful long term. We know the importance of environmental conditioning now and do not rely solely on genes to determine a person's behavior. Genes do not determine what social class or what type of person an individual will be in. Different races all have similar fitness in conjunction with genetics in one way or the other. This world we live in is still largely unknown. As a human race we are making great strides. We have learned that a small selective gene pool is actually more detrimental to our species than a large varied gene pool. Gene variance and diversity is the basic foundation of where life came from. Even if an individual has incredibly high fitness they are still subject to spontaneous and deleterious mutations. Since everybody is different, we are all
Open Document